Category Archives: conferences

Don’t miss the Digital Diversity 2015: Writing, Feminism, Culture conference at UofA/MacEwan on May 7-9th

KIAS is proud to sponsor Digital Diversity 2015: Writing | Feminism | Culture, an exciting conference to celebrate the Orlando Project’s 20th Anniversary, taking place at Grant MacEwan and the University of Alberta May 7-9th. The plenary lectures (see below) are free and open to the public.

For further information and the full program see http://digitaldiversity2015.org/

Marie-Louise Coolahan, National University of Ireland at Galway
“The Digital Turn and Early Modern Women’s Writing”
Thursday May 7, 3:45 – 5:15 PM
CN Lecture Theatre, MacEwan U

Wendy Hui Kyong Chun, Brown University
“Post-Recovery: Shadowy Absences and ‘Found Collectivity’”
Friday May 8, 11:00 AM – 12:30 PM
Lister Evergreen, Lister Conference Center, U of A

Jo-ann Episkenew, First Nations University of Canada
“Indigenous Youths’ Relational Wellbeing in the Digital Era”
Saturday May 9, 1:30 – 3:00 PM
Lister Wild Rose, Lister Conference Center, U of A

Wendy Hui Kyong Chun is Professor and Chair of Modern Culture and Media at Brown University and Visiting Professor at Leuphana University (Luneburg, Germany). Her current book project is titled Imaginary Networks, and she is the author of Programmed Visions: Software and Memory (2011) and Control and Freedom: Power and Paranoia in the Age of Fiber Optics (2006), both with MIT Press. Her research interests encompass new media, comparative media studies, Asian-American culture, and critical theory.

Marie-Louise Coolahan, Senior Lecturer in English at the National University of Ireland, Galway, was recently awarded a European Research Council Consolidator Grant for her major digital study, RECIRC: The Reception and Circulation of Early Modern Women’s Writing, 1550-1700. She is the author of Women, Writing, and Language in Early Modern Ireland (Oxford University Press, 2010), Co-Investigator of the collaborative ’Women’s Poetry 1400-1800 in English, Gaelic, Scots, Scots Gaelic and Welsh’ project, and a former member of the Perdita Project.

Jo-Ann Episkenew is Professor of English and Director of the Indigenous People’s Health Research Centre at the First Nations University of Canada. She is part of Acting Out!, a multi-university theatre project that develops aboriginal youth leadership and intersects with her research in indigenous literature of Canada and the United States, theatre and health, and literature and public policy. Dr Episkenew is the author of Taking Back Our Spirits: Indigenous Literature, Public Policy, and Healing (University of Winnipeg Press, 2009) and co-editor of Creating Community: A Roundtable on Aboriginal Literatures (Bearpaw and Theytus, 2002).

Digital Diversity Poster-page-001

Join the conversation on Big Data by using the hashtag #UofAWorld! Around the World 2015 is streaming live April 30th

Don’t miss the third annual Around the World 2015 live-streamed conference on Big Data and its impact on research and culture this Thursday, April 30 from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. You can stream the conference on our website at http://aroundtheworld.ualberta.ca and join the conversation by using the hashtag #‎UofAWorld‬! All-day public screening will also be set up in 131 Old Arts Building.

The Around the World initiative by KIAS brings together scholars from across the globe to talk about digital culture without the environmental cost of traditional conferences. Institutes and researchers who present or engage in discussions will be live-streamed world-wide and archived after the event.

This year’s theme is Big Data and the conference will stream live 8:00 am – 7:00 pm on April 30th, 2015. The benefits and challenges presented by working with Big Data sets continue to push the parameters of what constitutes meaningful and ethical research. KIAS is helping bring together a conversation from universities around the world, including speakers from Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, China, Germany, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Nigeria, and the United States. Join the conversation by using the hashtag #UofAWorld!

The 2014 conference on privacy and surveillance in the digital age reached 350 viewers tuning in to 12 hours of presentations from 39 presenters at 14 different institutions. During the course of the conference, the hashtag #UofAWorld generated over 320 tweets.

For further information and the archived talks from previous years please see: http://aroundtheworld.ualberta.ca/

Around the World 2015 conference on Big Data

‘Unsettling Colonial Modernity: Islamicate Contexts in Focus’ conference on April 24-25, 2015

You are cordially invited to attend the opening keynote lecture of the KIAS sponsored conference, Unsettling Colonial Modernity: Islamicate Contexts in Focus, delivered by Professor Sherene Razack (University of Toronto) on Friday April 24, 6:00pm at Alberta School of Business (BUS), Room 1-09. The lecture is titled: “A Catastrophically Damaged Gene Pool”: Race, Religion and Culture in the Security Hearing.

This event is free and open to all. It will be followed by a modest reception, hosted by the University of Alberta Academic Women’s Association.

Professor Razack’s talk is part of a two-day conference held at the University of Alberta on April 24 and 25. For more information about the conference and to see the full conference program, please visit:

Opening keynote lecture by Sherene Razack (Friday, April 24)
https://www.facebook.com/events/354455324752458/

Closing keynote lecture by Parin Dossa (Saturday, April 25)
https://www.facebook.com/events/1427415430887350/

Full conference program on FB
https://www.facebook.com/events/1403552646627524/

Full conference program on website
http://ucmconf.com/program/

LECTURE SYNOPSIS:
“Poor prognosis is associated with being religiously devout. In other words, the more religious the person, the more poor (sic) the prognosis.” (Michael Welner, psychiatrist, expert witness for the prosecution in the sentencing hearing of Omar Khadr at Guantanamo about Jihadists.)

The argument that Muslims possess a genetic incapacity for rational thought, an argument given credibility in the security hearing, requires a connection to be made between race, religion and culture. There has to be something innate (the race part) to Muslims, something they get from their religion or culture, that predisposes them to terrorism. In zones of an authorized non-legality such as Guantanamo, the argument about a pre-disposition to violence can be stitched together appealing to a repertoire of racist ideas. In this presentation, I explore the role that psychology and psychiatry play in establishing who is beyond the boundary of civilization, and thus who is an inmate of the zone where law has authorized its own suspension. In security hearings, psychologists and psychiatrists serving as expert witnesses guide the court in understanding Muslims and their religious/cultural predisposition for violence. Muslim savagery is read in the personality of the detainee, and in his practices of religiosity. Through a close reading of the sentencing of Omar Khadr by a military commission at Guantanamo, and specifically of the testimony of the psychiatrist Michael Welner, testimony that was the core of the state’s case against Khadr, I explore the key ideas of the security hearing that establish that Muslims have, in the words of Nicolai Sennels, a Far right propagandist of anti-Muslim racism, “a catastrophically damaged gene pool.”

ABOUT THE SPEAKER:
Sherene Razack is Professor of Social Justice Education at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education of the University of Toronto. She is the author and editor several books on feminism, race, gender, settler colonialism, and imperialism, including Race, Space and the Law: Unmapping a White Settler Society (2002); Dark Threats and White Knights: The Somalia Affair, Peacekeeping and the New Imperialism (2004); Casting Out: Race and the Eviction of Muslims From Western Law and Politics (2008); and States of Race: Critical Race feminism for the 21st Century (with Malinda Smith and Sunera Thobani) (2010).

ABOUT THE CONFERENCE:
This interdisciplinary conference brings together emerging and established scholars from across Canada and around the world to discuss the post-­colonial conditions of identity formation, and cultural, social, and political transformation in diverse contexts where Muslims live. Some panel titles include “Islamophobias, (War on) Terror, and Their Rising Complexities”; “Orientalism and Its Critical Reception”; “Gender Dynamics, Religion, and Cultural Belonging”; and “Limits of Multiculturalism.” Conference keynote lectures will be delivered by Sherene Razack (University of Toronto), and Parin Dossa (Simon Fraser University). To see full conference program visit: http://ucmconf.com/program/

CONFERENCE SPONSORS:
* Office of Interdisciplinary Studies, University of Alberta
* Faculty of Arts, University of Alberta
* Kule Institute for Advanced Study, University of Alberta
* Alberta Public Interest Research Group
* Department of Educational Policy Studies, University of Alberta