Category Archives: events

After Oil public roundtable draws large crowd, explores vital energy transition issues

(By Oliver Rossier and Angelique Rodrigues; Original published at https://uofa.ualberta.ca/arts/faculty-news/2015/august/video-after-oil-public-roundtable-draws-large-crowd-explores-vital-energy-transition-issues)

What comes after oil in Alberta? What would a post-fossil fuel future look like? Would we have to dramatically re-design cities, homes and transportation systems? And how can we shift our outlook now, to be ready for when those changes come?

These were just a few of the many difficult questions explored during the After Oil public roundtable held at the Art Gallery of Alberta on August 21.

Over 200 people packed the AGA for this discussion, which was expertly moderated by Todd Hirsch, Chief Economist (ATB Financial). Guest speaker Dr. Jennifer Jacquet (Environmental Studies, New York University) challenged the audience to think about the nuances of using shame as a tool, and suggested that shaming corporations might be a way to make environmental change more possible.

Full house at the AGA for After Oil 2015

Full house at the AGA for After Oil 2015

Dr. Imre Szeman, Canada Research Chair in Cultural Studies, described the importance of taking ownership of the rules of social structures related to petrocultures. Dr. Trevor Harrison, Director of the Parkland Institute, encouraged the audience to imagine redefining globalization and economic diversification. Panelist Simon O’Byrne, Vice President of Stantec’s Urban Planning, invited discussion about changing education systems to create engaged citizens and entrepreneurs. Eddy Isaacs (Chief Executive Officer, Alberta Innovates – Energy and Environment Solutions) urged the audience to recognize that energy literacy is a huge factor in our democracy.

Simon O'Byrne (VP, Urban Planning, Stantec) and Michael O'Driscoll (Petrocultures Research Team)

Simon O’Byrne (VP, Urban Planning, Stantec) and Michael O’Driscoll (Petrocultures Research Team)

The success of roundtable demonstrated that the Faculty of Arts, and UAlberta as a whole, can provide vital research leadership on these critical topics.

The full event video, linked here, shows the presentation by Jacquet and her fellow After Oil panellists, followed by a Q & A with members of the audience.

The After Oil public roundtable was part of a larger After Oil School, which saw academics from around the world come together at the University of Alberta from August 19 to 22 to research and discuss the economic, political and sociological impacts of transitioning to life after oil.

Out of the conference, researchers will produce a policy brief and research paper, both of which will be available to media and the public on the After Oil website in the coming weeks.

Scroll through the After Oil Storify below to read Tweets from our panellists, audience members and After Oil school participants.

Related links:
Petrocultures website: http://petrocultures.com/
Storify capturing the Twitter conversation: https://storify.com/KIASAlberta/what-comes-after-oil
Introductory article by Angelique Rodrigues: https://uofa.ualberta.ca/arts/faculty-news/2015/august/what-comes-after-oil-in-alberta
KIAS After Oil research page: https://uofa.ualberta.ca/kule-institute/projects/szeman-after-oil
Trending topics on Twitter in Edmonton: http://www.trendinalia.com/twitter-trending-topics/canada/edmonton-150822.html

Media coverage (to Aug 23):
Global News Edmonton
Byline: Shallima Maharaj
http://globalnews.ca/video/2180505/global-edmonton-news-hour-116

CBR-AM (CBC Radio One Calgary)
Byline: Donna Mcelligott
http://www.cbc.ca/albertaatnoon/episode/2015/08/21/an-thursday-august-20-2015-1/

CBC French
Byline: Genevieve Potvin
http://ici.radio-canada.ca/emissions/la_croisee/2014-2015/chronique.asp?idChronique=381069

Advertisements

What comes after oil, for Alberta, for Canada and for the world?

Petrocultures, The Kule Institute for Advanced Study and UAlberta’s Faculty of Arts invite you to

After Oil: A Free Public Roundtable

Friday, August 21, 2015

7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Art Gallery of Alberta/AGA Ledcor Theatre

Members of the public are invited to come together to engage in big picture thinking about the importance of energy for our societies, and to consider together the difficult question of energy transition.

After 150 years of solid drilling, it’s unclear how much oil is left, and the negative effects of our reliance on this fossil fuel have never been more clear than they are today. How will our societies continue to thrive and prosper once our dominant source of energy is no longer available?

In the wake of a recent dramatic change in government, this roundtable provides an opportunity to pose questions about the deeper significance of oil for the shape and character of Alberta, and to start figuring out answers to these difficult questions – before it’s too late.

The After Oil roundtable will be led by New York University Professor Jennifer Jacquet, an environmental social scientist who explores large-scale cooperation dilemmas, including climate change. Jacquet will discuss the issues raised in her compelling new book Is Shame Necessary? in the context of oil and Alberta. Each panelist will have a chance to respond before the discussion is opened up to the audience.

Participants:

Moderator: Todd Hirsch (Chief Economist, ATB Financial)

Guest Speaker: Jennifer Jacquet (Environmental Studies, New York University)

Respondents:

Simon O’Byrne (Vice-President, Urban Planning, Stantec)
Eddy Isaacs (Chief Executive Officer, Alberta Innovates – Energy and Environment Solutions)
Sheena Wilson (Petrocultures, University of Alberta)
Imre Szeman (Canada Research Chair in Cultural Studies – University of Alberta)
Trevor Harrison (Director, Parkland Institute, University of Alberta)

R.S.V.P. for After Oil here.

Please note, seating is limited.

Read more about the event on the Faculty of Arts’ After Oil website.

For more information about the After Oil KIAS cluster project, click here.

For more information on the Petrocultures research group at the University of Alberta, click here.

After Oil

Don’t miss the Digital Diversity 2015: Writing, Feminism, Culture conference at UofA/MacEwan on May 7-9th

KIAS is proud to sponsor Digital Diversity 2015: Writing | Feminism | Culture, an exciting conference to celebrate the Orlando Project’s 20th Anniversary, taking place at Grant MacEwan and the University of Alberta May 7-9th. The plenary lectures (see below) are free and open to the public.

For further information and the full program see http://digitaldiversity2015.org/

Marie-Louise Coolahan, National University of Ireland at Galway
“The Digital Turn and Early Modern Women’s Writing”
Thursday May 7, 3:45 – 5:15 PM
CN Lecture Theatre, MacEwan U

Wendy Hui Kyong Chun, Brown University
“Post-Recovery: Shadowy Absences and ‘Found Collectivity’”
Friday May 8, 11:00 AM – 12:30 PM
Lister Evergreen, Lister Conference Center, U of A

Jo-ann Episkenew, First Nations University of Canada
“Indigenous Youths’ Relational Wellbeing in the Digital Era”
Saturday May 9, 1:30 – 3:00 PM
Lister Wild Rose, Lister Conference Center, U of A

Wendy Hui Kyong Chun is Professor and Chair of Modern Culture and Media at Brown University and Visiting Professor at Leuphana University (Luneburg, Germany). Her current book project is titled Imaginary Networks, and she is the author of Programmed Visions: Software and Memory (2011) and Control and Freedom: Power and Paranoia in the Age of Fiber Optics (2006), both with MIT Press. Her research interests encompass new media, comparative media studies, Asian-American culture, and critical theory.

Marie-Louise Coolahan, Senior Lecturer in English at the National University of Ireland, Galway, was recently awarded a European Research Council Consolidator Grant for her major digital study, RECIRC: The Reception and Circulation of Early Modern Women’s Writing, 1550-1700. She is the author of Women, Writing, and Language in Early Modern Ireland (Oxford University Press, 2010), Co-Investigator of the collaborative ’Women’s Poetry 1400-1800 in English, Gaelic, Scots, Scots Gaelic and Welsh’ project, and a former member of the Perdita Project.

Jo-Ann Episkenew is Professor of English and Director of the Indigenous People’s Health Research Centre at the First Nations University of Canada. She is part of Acting Out!, a multi-university theatre project that develops aboriginal youth leadership and intersects with her research in indigenous literature of Canada and the United States, theatre and health, and literature and public policy. Dr Episkenew is the author of Taking Back Our Spirits: Indigenous Literature, Public Policy, and Healing (University of Winnipeg Press, 2009) and co-editor of Creating Community: A Roundtable on Aboriginal Literatures (Bearpaw and Theytus, 2002).

Digital Diversity Poster-page-001

Join the conversation on Big Data by using the hashtag #UofAWorld! Around the World 2015 is streaming live April 30th

Don’t miss the third annual Around the World 2015 live-streamed conference on Big Data and its impact on research and culture this Thursday, April 30 from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. You can stream the conference on our website at http://aroundtheworld.ualberta.ca and join the conversation by using the hashtag #‎UofAWorld‬! All-day public screening will also be set up in 131 Old Arts Building.

The Around the World initiative by KIAS brings together scholars from across the globe to talk about digital culture without the environmental cost of traditional conferences. Institutes and researchers who present or engage in discussions will be live-streamed world-wide and archived after the event.

This year’s theme is Big Data and the conference will stream live 8:00 am – 7:00 pm on April 30th, 2015. The benefits and challenges presented by working with Big Data sets continue to push the parameters of what constitutes meaningful and ethical research. KIAS is helping bring together a conversation from universities around the world, including speakers from Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, China, Germany, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Nigeria, and the United States. Join the conversation by using the hashtag #UofAWorld!

The 2014 conference on privacy and surveillance in the digital age reached 350 viewers tuning in to 12 hours of presentations from 39 presenters at 14 different institutions. During the course of the conference, the hashtag #UofAWorld generated over 320 tweets.

For further information and the archived talks from previous years please see: http://aroundtheworld.ualberta.ca/

Around the World 2015 conference on Big Data

Please join us for the 2015 Arts Celebration of Research on April 21, 3:30pm @ TIMMS

Improvisation, Speculation 
 Tuesday, April 21, 2015
Timms Centre for the Arts
3:30 p.m. Program
   4:30 p.m. Reception

To RSVP, please click here

This year’s event will feature fast-paced, three minute presentations from some of the most exciting researchers in the Faculty of Arts. We’ve asked them to consider how research in the social sciences, humanities and fine arts responds to a changing world, and how our best minds look to the future to reveal both opportunity and risk.

The presentations will be followed by an improvisational performance of “Cap It!” by Professor of Music Scott Smallwood.

Come discover with us, through chance and design, what makes our work invaluable to the present day, and to the next moment.

Presenters

Mark Nuttall
“Anticipation in a world of becoming”

Mark Nuttall is Professor and Henry Marshall Tory Chair in the Department of Anthropology. Among his current projects, he is co-PI of the EU-funded ICE-ARC (Ice, Climate and Economics–the Arctic Region in Change). His latest book is The Scramble for the Poles, co-authored with Klaus Dodds and to be published by Polity later this year.

Temitope Oriola
“#Bringbackourgirls: Boko Haram’s fatua on Nigeria”

Temitope Oriola is Assistant Professor (criminology and socio-legal studies) in the Department of Sociology. A recipient of the Governor General of Canada Academic Gold Medal, Oriola’s works appear in leading journals such as Sociology, the British Journal of CriminologyCritical Studies on Terrorism, and African Security, among others. He is author of Criminal Resistance? The Politics of Kidnapping Oil Workers.


Yasmeen Abu-Laban
“Encounters with the Duck-Rabbit and the Role of Improvisation and Speculation”

Yasmeen Abu-Laban is Professor in the Department of Political Science. She has published widely on issues relating to the Canadian and comparative dimensions of gender and racialization processes, border and migration policies and surveillance, as well as citizenship theory. Her current research includes a SSHRC-funded project dealing with the United Nations and World Conferences Against Racism, a book project on human rights in Canada supported by a McCalla professorship, as well as a book project addressing Canadian immigration policy trends since 2000.

Chloë Taylor
“Furry Food: Ethico-ontological speculations on what we eat”

Chloë Taylor is Assistant Professor of Women’s and Gender Studies and Philosophy. She has a PhD in Philosophy from the University of Toronto and was a Tomlinson postdoctoral fellow in Philosophy at McGill University. Her research interests include 20th century French philosophy, philosophy of sexuality, feminist philosophy and animal ethics.

Juhani Järvikivi
“Who wants to hear a fairytale in the evening?”

Juhani Järvikivi is an Associate Professor of Linguistics, Director of the Centre for Comparative Psycholinguistics and the founding Director of STEP Spring Training in Experimental Psycholinguistics. His research examines the influence of linguistic and non-linguistic context on real-time language processing, especially how these influence the development of children’s language comprehension.


Maureen Engel

“Visualizing Homelessness”

Maureen Engel is Assistant Professor of Humanities Computing, Director of the Canadian Institute for Research Computing in Arts (CIRCA) and co-investigator on the Edmonton Pipelines | Narrating Digital Urbanisms project — a collaborative research cell that aims to technologically intervene in our notions of what urban space is, and how we constitute and are constituted by it. Her background is in cultural studies, queer theory and feminist theory.

Jan Selman 
“Improvisation, Speculation: Democratizing the Room with Participatory Theatre”

Jan Selman’s creation and research focus is using theatre to animate community issues. Projects include Old Stories in New Ways, which adapts traditional resonant stories for contemporary times; Story House by Tanzanian-Canadian writer/performer Tololwa Mollel; and Are We There Yet? — a Community-University Research Alliance which adapted and assessed the impact of a participatory play and sex ed program in urban, rural and Aboriginal communities.

Scott Smallwood
“Sonic Discovery through Listening, Phonography, and Improvisation”

Scott Smallwood is a composer, improviser and sound artist whose work deals with discovered textures and forms through a practice of field recording and deep listening. He works extensively with technology, designing software and hardware instruments and devices, as well as traditional acoustic instruments. He teaches music composition and technology at the U of A, where he also serves as the Director of Humanities Computing.

‘Unsettling Colonial Modernity: Islamicate Contexts in Focus’ conference on April 24-25, 2015

You are cordially invited to attend the opening keynote lecture of the KIAS sponsored conference, Unsettling Colonial Modernity: Islamicate Contexts in Focus, delivered by Professor Sherene Razack (University of Toronto) on Friday April 24, 6:00pm at Alberta School of Business (BUS), Room 1-09. The lecture is titled: “A Catastrophically Damaged Gene Pool”: Race, Religion and Culture in the Security Hearing.

This event is free and open to all. It will be followed by a modest reception, hosted by the University of Alberta Academic Women’s Association.

Professor Razack’s talk is part of a two-day conference held at the University of Alberta on April 24 and 25. For more information about the conference and to see the full conference program, please visit:

Opening keynote lecture by Sherene Razack (Friday, April 24)
https://www.facebook.com/events/354455324752458/

Closing keynote lecture by Parin Dossa (Saturday, April 25)
https://www.facebook.com/events/1427415430887350/

Full conference program on FB
https://www.facebook.com/events/1403552646627524/

Full conference program on website
http://ucmconf.com/program/

LECTURE SYNOPSIS:
“Poor prognosis is associated with being religiously devout. In other words, the more religious the person, the more poor (sic) the prognosis.” (Michael Welner, psychiatrist, expert witness for the prosecution in the sentencing hearing of Omar Khadr at Guantanamo about Jihadists.)

The argument that Muslims possess a genetic incapacity for rational thought, an argument given credibility in the security hearing, requires a connection to be made between race, religion and culture. There has to be something innate (the race part) to Muslims, something they get from their religion or culture, that predisposes them to terrorism. In zones of an authorized non-legality such as Guantanamo, the argument about a pre-disposition to violence can be stitched together appealing to a repertoire of racist ideas. In this presentation, I explore the role that psychology and psychiatry play in establishing who is beyond the boundary of civilization, and thus who is an inmate of the zone where law has authorized its own suspension. In security hearings, psychologists and psychiatrists serving as expert witnesses guide the court in understanding Muslims and their religious/cultural predisposition for violence. Muslim savagery is read in the personality of the detainee, and in his practices of religiosity. Through a close reading of the sentencing of Omar Khadr by a military commission at Guantanamo, and specifically of the testimony of the psychiatrist Michael Welner, testimony that was the core of the state’s case against Khadr, I explore the key ideas of the security hearing that establish that Muslims have, in the words of Nicolai Sennels, a Far right propagandist of anti-Muslim racism, “a catastrophically damaged gene pool.”

ABOUT THE SPEAKER:
Sherene Razack is Professor of Social Justice Education at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education of the University of Toronto. She is the author and editor several books on feminism, race, gender, settler colonialism, and imperialism, including Race, Space and the Law: Unmapping a White Settler Society (2002); Dark Threats and White Knights: The Somalia Affair, Peacekeeping and the New Imperialism (2004); Casting Out: Race and the Eviction of Muslims From Western Law and Politics (2008); and States of Race: Critical Race feminism for the 21st Century (with Malinda Smith and Sunera Thobani) (2010).

ABOUT THE CONFERENCE:
This interdisciplinary conference brings together emerging and established scholars from across Canada and around the world to discuss the post-­colonial conditions of identity formation, and cultural, social, and political transformation in diverse contexts where Muslims live. Some panel titles include “Islamophobias, (War on) Terror, and Their Rising Complexities”; “Orientalism and Its Critical Reception”; “Gender Dynamics, Religion, and Cultural Belonging”; and “Limits of Multiculturalism.” Conference keynote lectures will be delivered by Sherene Razack (University of Toronto), and Parin Dossa (Simon Fraser University). To see full conference program visit: http://ucmconf.com/program/

CONFERENCE SPONSORS:
* Office of Interdisciplinary Studies, University of Alberta
* Faculty of Arts, University of Alberta
* Kule Institute for Advanced Study, University of Alberta
* Alberta Public Interest Research Group
* Department of Educational Policy Studies, University of Alberta

Stitched Narratives exhibition opens April 9, 2015

The Kule Institute for Advanced Study is proud to sponsor:

Stitched Narratives exhibition – April 9, 2015, to February 19, 2016
Human Ecology Gallery, Human Ecology Building, University of Alberta East Campus, Edmonton, Alberta

Dr. Anne Bissonnette, Larisa Cheladyn, Stephanie Huolt, Robyn Stobbs and Sarah Woodyard co-curators as part of the graduate course “Material Culture and Curatorship” (HECOL 668)

Stitched objects communicate powerful ideas to those who understand a needle’s language. Though they speak differently than words on a page, seamstresses’ and embroiderers’ creations are rich in cultural, historical, and social meaning. “Stitched Narratives” explores these modes of expression, unraveling hand sewing’s complex stories. From eighteenth-century gowns and quilted textiles that speak of a highly organized and skilled labour force to twentieth-century garments that link the present to the past to remember a journey of immigration, the exhibition tells woven tales and showcases the hand’s many talents.

Sponsored by The Kule Institute for Advanced Study and The Bohdan Medwidsky Ukrainian Folklore Archives.

Opening reception April 9, 2015, from 5 to 6 pm

Stitched Narratives eVite